Sycamore Gap at Hadrian's Wall

WHEN the American poet Robert Frost said: “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall”, he clearly wasn’t thinking of Hadrian’s Wall. Quite a lot of people love that ancient boundary between England and Scotland – or north Britain as it was before the Angles and the Scots came along – as demonstrated by the numbers walking the stretch towards Sycamore Gap when we visited recently on a cold, clear, sunny November day.

We humans are good at trying to divide things up with neat lines, particularly in that part of the world where there have been divisions and lines and boundaries – and battles over them – for thousands of years. Hadrian’s effort just happens to be the one that’s survived physically for the longest so far.

But what struck me most driving through Northumberland, then through southern Scotland on our way home north, was how similar the two are – the wild moorlands on either side of the Border which give way to isolated farms and rolling fields. The use of language and expressions are similar too – and I suspect rural north Northumberland is frequently as neglected and overlooked by politicians in London as rural southern Scotland is by those in Glasgow and Edinburgh, giving the two areas far more in common with each other than with their respective national cities.

Sycamore Gap is the most visited spot on Hadrian’s Wall, quite an achievement when you consider this is an 80-mile coast-to-coast World Heritage Site, with the remains of forts, bathhouses and shrines along its length. I suspect its appearance in the 1991 blockbuster movie Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves has an awful lot to do with that but then there are thousands of blockbuster movie scenes which aren’t still capturing folks’ imaginations 25 years on. So I rather hope that subconsciously people are drawn here by the fact there is a gap, a break in the wall, a link between the two halves, marked by something living and thriving. Because, in fact, we don’t love a wall.

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