Snow Fest, whatever the weather

Credit: Bruce Wilkinson for Ski-Scotland

Ski-Scotland is ploughing on regardless despite a lack of the white stuff this winter and holding its annual Snow Fest this Saturday, with activities guaranteed, whatever the snow conditions are.

The Snow Fest fun include Zibob racing, igloo building and a snowman competition at Glencoe Mountain, a Burton Riglet taster session for the youngest snowboarders at CairnGorm mountain, who are also offering shop discounts on some ski accessories and prizes for the best photos and posts on Facebook and Instagram. Meanwhile at Glenshee, there’s live music all day (10am till 4pm) from three bands. At Nevis Range there is a snow sculpture competition and the chance to watch the SARDA Rescue Dogs in action. Where snow allows, there will also be the traditional mass descent at 1pm.

Chair of Ski-Scotland Heather Negus said: “No one can deny that it’s been a challenging winter for Scotland’s snowsports areas. However, it’s not really been a mild winter. We have had good snow and some brilliant overhead weather for T-shirt skiing, but the fluctuating temperatures have meant that it’s been a bit of a stop-start season so far. Remember that we usually expect to ski well into May and that in previous years which had this sort of weather pattern there have often been large dumps of snow well into the spring.”

Skills for the hills

Good to see my Scots Magazine colleague Cameron McNeish involved on a great event aimed at getting folk up into Scotland’s wonderful hills and mountains.

Skills for the Hills, organised by Mountain Aid, working with Mountaineering Scotland, will take place on Saturday at Glasgow’s Royal Concert Halls.

There will be 40 leading outdoor organisations taking part, with a mix of exhibitions, talks and demonstrations aimed at helping and encouraging people of all levels of experience, from newcomer to experienced mountaineers.

The event will be opened by Mountain Aid patron and outdoor writer and broadcaster Cameron McNeish, who will also be one of the main speakers, along with fellow outdoor writer Chris Townsend, Mountaineering Scotland safety expert Heather Morning, and speakers from mountain rescue, John Muir Trust and other organisations.

Jim Kinnell, of Mountain Aid, said: “This will be a great event whether you’re an experienced mountaineer or whether you’re just thinking about starting to go hill walking. With the days getting longer and spring just around the corner, this is the time when people really start to think about getting out into the hills and we’re expecting over 2000 people on the day.”

Skills for the Hills will run from 10am to 4.30pm, with tickets costing £2 per adult and £1 per child on the door, including a free Event Programme.

For a complete timetable of talks and other information visit the website at www.mountainaid.org.uk

Danny MacAskill – falling off is inspiring

My six-year-old son was recreating stunt cyclist Danny MacAskill’s The Ridge last night using the back and the arms of the sofa – I should swiftly add here that he didn’t have a bike, although, admittedly, even in his bare feet it’s probably not the best thing for our furniture.

But it’s great to see him inspired by the Skye-born YouTube star – and key, I think, is the fact that MacAskill often includes outtakes in his films, showing just how many failed attempts go into getting that one great shot leaping off a cliff, balancing along a rooftop or, in the case of The Ridge, along the top of a mountain. They’re certainly our children’s favourite bits and it’s brilliant for them to see even stars like MacAskill – 100 million social media views – mess up and have to try, try again.

My other half said as much to him when she met him the other week at Lindores Cross Country in Fife where he was helping to launch a horse jump built in his honour. It was at Lindores that he filmed the hay bale stunt for Wee Day Out, one of his most successful films – so successful that the luxury horse and people retreat decided to recreate him and his bale for the entertainment of their riding guests. And he agreed it was great to shatter the illusion – he fell off that hay bale 400 times over three days for the 20 second shot in the film.

He also said one of his biggest thrills was getting fan mail from schools and finding out they’d shown his films to pupils to help teach them about geography or physics. Nice guy, great role model – look out for his new film from Lindores, “racing” against top Scottish eventer Louisa Milne Home over a series of jumps including the new MacAskill one.

Philip Rankin RIP

Philip Rankin (right) with Hamish MacInnes at the Glencoe Mountain ski resort

A “pioneer” of Scotland’s ski-ing industry has died a month short of his 100th birthday.

A campaign had been launched for Philip Rankin, who would have celebrated his centenary on April 16, to be honoured for his work including building the first ski tow in the 1950s at Glencoe.

That campaign received a massive boost when Mr Rankin received a lifetime achievement from Snowsport Scotland in December.

Mr Rankin, a former RAF pilot in World War Two, led a group of Clyde shipyard workers who hauled lumps of metal up a Glencoe mountain in order to create the first ski tow.

That tow helped to spawn an industry which has gone on to generate millions for the economy every year and helped to establish Glencoe Mountain as a popular mountain sports destination.

He died at his home in Ballachulish last Sunday (Mar 12) following a short illness.

Victoria Sutherland, a friend and campaigner, said she was with him a few days before he passed away. She said: “I was sitting with him he said ‘I did achieve something in my life didn’t I?’ I assured him that he was already a legend!

“There is no doubt that a ski-ing industry would have eventually been developed in Scotland but his vision that early, I am sure, meant that ski-ing in Scotland became a reality many years earlier than would have been the case otherwise.

“Speak to any ski-ier and they will tell you that Glencoe has the best and most challenging runs in Scotland, both for skiers and snowboarders. It also holds the snow longer into Spring than any other resort. Glencoe continues to have a very loyal following.”

Before the 1950s the only people who ventured into the Scottish mountains in winter were hardened climbers but Mr Rankin saw skiing as an exciting new sport.

The former engineer moved to Ballachulish in 1954 to concentrate on the venture. Members of the Scottish Ski Club, made up largely of doctors and lawyers, then joined forces with the Clan Mountaineering Club whose members came from the shipyards of the Clyde to build the tow in 1955 on the slopes of Meall a’ Bhùiridh.

The metal plate and steel cables needed for the tow were “acquired” from Glasgow’s shipyards and were carried up the hill on the backs of the men under Philip’s supervision. It was ready for use in February 1956 and its opening marked the creation of the first commercial ski centre in Scotland.

Campaigners were hugely disappointed last year to find out that Mr Rankin’s age meant he was disqualified from being considered for an MBE. Ms Sutherland had received a letter from Honour Administrator Steven Colquhoun stating: “I have to advise that the UK Government Honours guidance stipulates that an individual must still be involved in the activity for which they are being nominated.” He goes on to say that there can be a “short period of grace” after retirement but after that they are “time-barred”.

 

Good news for trees!

Having been out planting ten of them at my children’s school earlier this week, trees are definitely on my mind, especially after hearing of some great facts uncovered by scientists in Scotland.

Botanists at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh have found out that cold and windy weather might well have saved the lives of thousands of trees on the Isle of Man.

Dutch elm disease was the tree disaster story of the 1970s and 80s, with up to 75 million trees having been lost on the British mainland. But in the Isle of Man only around one per cent have succumbed even now.

Scientists first thought that they were somehow resistant – but now they believe it’s down to the weather. Dutch elm disease is a fungus that hitchhikes on the bodies of tiny elm bark beetles – and the beetles need it to be at least 20C to fly and not too windy either. And most years it’s been just too cold and windy for them to spread to the island in the Irish Sea.

And there’s more good news in that it might be the same case in Scotland. According to Botanics experts, north of Aberdeen Dutch elm disease seems to disappear and wych elms – Britain’s only native elm and also known as the Scots elm – are very hardy. The English elm, one variety which really got hammered in the 1970s, is actually a clone, reproduced through grafts and cuttings – one of the reasons why it fared so badly.

Of course, there’s always the fear that as our weather warms, the beetle might get more active and the disease might spread. But as spring tries to emerge amid the wind and snow, it’s good to know.

Wolf calls grow louder

A version of this article first appeared on February 21, 2017 in the Daily Telegraph

By Nick Drainey

High in the Cairngorms, the old gnarled Scots pines we see now were once saplings, growing while shepherds stood guarding their lambs from packs of wolves.

For award-winning TV presenter and cameraman Simon King that scene, dating back more than three centuries, should once again become a feature of the Scottish countryside –one he claims will benefit the communities who live in the Highlands.

“If we are talking about reintroducing apex predators such as wolves and lnyx, yes, good plan because we killed them in the first place and it wasn’t that long ago,” says King, who is a well-known face on the BBC’s Springwatch and Big Cat Diary and Planet Earth.

It is widely thought Sir Ewen Cameron shot the last wold in Scotland at Killiecrankie in 1680 although some reports suggest the animal was still surviving a century later.

While predatory animals need to be respected, fears over damage to farm animals are overblown, King says.

“What we did was upset the apple cart monstrously by eradicating wild boar and beaver, which have started to make a comeback, and by eradicating all apex predators – they haven’t made a comeback because we are so phobic about losing a single lamb.

“Shepherds are so-called because they used to sit on the hill protecting sheep against just such predations. But we have lost the idea of living in harmony with everything about us – I am not being romantic about this, I have spent plenty of time in communities which do have depredations from lions and tigers and leopards.”

King says the tourism benefits would also help rural economies. He says: “You would have the most magnificent experience as a visitor … If there is the opportunity to walk in a landscape where you stand a chance of seeing a wolf on the hillside, albeit a kilometre away chasing a herd of deer, yes you are going to go and see it, the best show on earth.

“There are Scots pines that had wolves brushing along their flanks when they were saplings still standing now and when you realise that and touch the trees you realise how wrong it was to take this balancing of the natural world out of the equation.”

In 2003, Paul Lister, bought the 23,000 acre Alladale estate near Bonar Bridge in Sutherland with aim of turning it into a wilderness reserve. Although he has introduced boars and elk, his idea of wolves has stalled amid strong opposition to the requirement for a fence to be built around the land.

But calls for re-wilding, or returning land to its natural state, have become louder in Scotland in recent years, but King says that as well as allowing wild animals to thrive, we also need to change our own habits to help the environment.

That can be something as simple as questioning where our food comes from and working out the “true cost” of what we eat.

King says food and growth are the biggest challenges to the planet. “As we consume, not just food but resources in other ways, it affects the face of the land very dramatically.

“We have lost the connection with what it takes to create something that gives us energy. A simple example is if you go in a roadside café and buy a bacon sarnie, it is very tempting, they smell good. But where did the bread come from, how was the wheat grown and how much grain did it take to feed the pig and indeed how did that pig live – would you eat it if you saw how much antibiotic had been put into it?”

King says while governments could be tougher on industrial practices in farming or manufacturing there needs to be a “paradigm shift” in our own everyday habits where “stuff” can dominate people’s lives. But he admits it is hard. “We are where we are today … it is too easy to make bad decisions. There is not a single industry or farm that doesn’t depend on a customer, so relinquish responsibility and point at politicians and systems and say ‘get it right’? No, get it right with what you buy.”

King has travelled the world filming wildlife for major TV series but Scotland is somewhere he loves above all and he will be appearing at the Wild Film Festival Scotland which takes place in Dumfries in March. The first event of its kind in the UK, it will celebrate the natural world through film, photography and discussion, and bring together internationally renowned photographers and film makers.

King says: “When I am asked, I say my favourite place on earth is Scotland by quite a margin. My mother was born in Glasgow so the sound of Scotland rings true to me in terms of the human language and the sense that there can be wilderness in such a small isle. There are tracts of Scotland which still have an edge of wilderness about them – I am not saying there are places where no man has ever trod but in most of the rest of the British Isles there is a constant suppression and sense of dominion. Wherever you turn it has been tweaked or cut, or sprayed or trimmed and I find that obscene, an abuse of the most precious resource we have which is the earth beneath our feet. In Scotland, I can feel as though there is a balance and a harmony and that makes me feel good.”

*The Wild Film Festival Scotland takes place in Dumfries Between March 24 and 26. For more information go to www.wildfilmfestivalscotland.co.uk.