A version of this walk description appeared in Scotland on Sunday on April 30, 2006

BEN VRACKIE, PITLOCHRY

Ben Vrackie is one of the finest mountains in Scotland where you climb up high to reach a proper pointed summit with great views over the Perthshire and Grampian mountains.
The wonderful Moulin Hotel at its base helps to make it even better.

DISTANCE: 6 miles.

HEIGHT CLIMBED: 2,100 ft.

TIME: 4 to 5 hours.

MAPS: OS Landranger 43 and 52.

PARK: Turn left at the Moulin Hotel, about a mile from the centre of Pitlochry along the A924, then go right a couple of hundred yards later. The car park is at the top of the single track road on the right.

IN SUMMARY: Ben Vrackie looks great, it is rocky, pointy and dominates the town of Pitlochry below. It’s not a Munro but it is up there as one of the finest summits in Scotland. A walk up is just as a day up a mountain should be; a little strenuous and exhilarating with brilliant mountain views and real sense of achievement.

The route starts on a signed path which takes you out of the car park and alongside the Moulin Burn. Higher up, the sight of the 2,760ft summit greets you – don’t worry about the daunting appearance with a large craggy face looming above, the route up is not as hard it looks.

On reaching two wooden benches from you can take a breather and look back across Pitlochry and down the River Tummel to the Tay beyond. Shortly after the bench ignore a path to the left and carry on to Loch a’ Choire with the summit of Ben Vrackie rising steeply above it.

Cross the grassy dam by the edge of the loch and go up the well built path on the other side. The path zig-zags its way up and is easy to follow (if a little strenuous on the lungs). Near the top the path goes round to the left before a final steep section to reach the summit cairn. Stop and give yourself a pat on the back before using the view indicator to locate mountains from Schiehallion to the south west, the mountains of Lochaber in the far distance to the west and the Grampians to the north.

Retrace your steps to the start.

Note that in winter conditions the use of ice axes and crampons maybe necessary.

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